Mar
20
7:00 PM19:00
TNT

TNT - Black Holes From Drawings

Ed Friedman

The physics of black holes is notoriously math intensive, so much so that many people are put off from exploring this amazing field of science. Happily, methods have been developed that exploit simple graphs to allow us to understand what happens near (and inside) the horizon of black holes. Using this technique, we gain insight into changes in clock rates near massive objects, why a hole traps the unwary, what we observe when a friend approaches a black hole (it's not what you expect), communication into and out of the horizon and wormholes. In addition, some fantastical ideas about time travel are fully clarified. This lecture will provide even grade schoolers with metaphors that can be used to explain black hole science to their friends and family. 

Ed Friedman is a graduate of the University of Maryland (BS in Physics in 1966) and Wayne State University (PhD in Physics in 1972 with a dissertation on superconducting thin films). He worked for 42 years on remote sensing systems for civil, defense and intelligence applications. Prior to retiring, he was with Ball Aerospace a total of 15 years. While at Ball, he was Chief Scientist of the Civil Space group and head of an optics design laboratory. He was a Visiting Scientist at NCAR working on space-based remote sensing of climate change. In 2002 he was selected as a Boeing Technical Fellow. He has been a member of National Research Council advisory groups supporting NASA programs. He has taught astronomy and mathematics at the college level and was Adjunct Faculty at the University of Colorado while his student earned a PhD (2002) working on an electro-optics topic that led to refereed publications and a patent. He taught Orbital Dynamics for Webster University at Ball Aerospace. He is author of three books on electro-optics and was Chairperson of the 2009 AAS Guidance and Control Conference and editor of the proceedings. He now volunteers at several schools and is a substitute high school math and physics teacher. He is a consultant for NASA as a proposal reviewer. 

View Event →

Feb
20
7:00 PM19:00
TNT

TNT - Unusual Mountain Building 101

Geologists like to make mountains by smashing things into continents, like India crashing into Asia made the Himalaya.  The Colorado Rockies are different somehow: this area sank down into the ocean before popping up about 70 million years ago. But after being drowned from above, the crust in Colorado might also have been drowned from below, perhaps a unique process that might finally answer the question, why is Denver the Mile High City?

Craig Jones

Craig has spent a career putting seismometers in odd spots to try and figure out how all the mountains in the western U.S. came to be. He's been a professor in geology at CU Boulder long enough to remember Crossroads Mall, cattle grazing where Flatiron Crossing is now, and CU having a consistently good football team. He is also the author of the book "The Mountains that Remade America: How Sierra Nevada Geology Impacts Modern Life".

 

View Event →